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“Contrary to what those foul feminists will tell you, the prostitute is not a victim,” he says. “If you talk to them, and I’ve met thousands, they don’t often find themselves victimised and exploited, but the middle-class intellectuals who formulate their opinions for them tell them that they are. There’s a whole rescue operation going on at the moment made up of social workers, community leaders and politicians, and it’s in their interests to find suffering. There is exploitation, but there is exploitation in all industries.”
Horsley is the product of a privileged and eccentric background, and he makes a living out of his outrageous behaviour and utterings. His attempt to recreate the depraved Parisian existence of his absinthe-fuelled artistic heroes makes him an easy target for derision, and, in fact, anger: only a poor little rich boy could play at being a prostitute and a heroin addict, and base a life philosophy on it. But he is up-front about his behaviour, unlike the rest of those one in 10 men who must feel there is something wrong with using a prostitute, or they wouldn’t be so keen to hide it. “Who are we to tell someone what parts they can and cannot sell of themselves?,” he asks. Prostitutes are not stupid, but they have different skills. You don’t get prostitutes telling the politicians how they should be earning a living, do you?”
Jacqui Smith believes demand dictates supply, an argument with a clear logic, and if there weren’t so many men like Horsley willing to pay for sex, women would not face the choice of entering an industry in which exploitation is rife. The oft-cited example is Sweden, where the buying of sex was criminalised almost a decade ago. In Lithuania and Finland it is already illegal to pay for sex with someone acting under coercion, as will happen here under the new legislation, and Norway is set to follow Sweden’s lead. But Sweden is the example cited by those who support the Smith reforms. When the law was passed there were around 2,500 sex workers; now there are just 500, and Sweden is the least popular human trafficking destination in Europe.
Making it an offence to pay for sex with anyone acting under coercion and where ignorance is no defence, even when the party paying for sex has asked and been lied to, is intended to scare a large sector of punters away from visiting prostitutes, not just trafficked workers. “It is middle-class people with jobs trying to control deviant behaviour,” says Horsley, dismissively.
As it is, it’s very easy, and often very cheap, to find paid-for sex. Every small town has always housed a brothel of some sort, where regulars would find sex and companionship in the arms of reliable women, but now you can go online and pick women like sweets. If it becomes less socially acceptable – because men are forced to assume most prostitutes are working under duress – and trickier in practical terms to find sex, the theory is that, as in Sweden, the industry will shrink.
The English Collective of Prostitutes, and Samantha, do not agree. “Where have those prostitutes in Sweden gone?” she asks. “They still need the money. They’ve gone underground. Or they’ve gone to work in other countries. There is still the same number of prostitutes around. If you don’t want to be found, you won’t be. They still have to pay the bills or feed a drug habit. The reasons they are prostitutes are still there. The further they crack down, the more underground we will have to go. So streetworkers will take more risks to earn the same amount per night, which is horrendous. You’re making yourself more vulnerable.”
Samantha no longer needs to work as a prostitute. She says she began out of necessity to support her family, though it was her husband who suggested it. He supported her during the rape trial but later turned violent and she fled the marriage. Does she regret starting? “That’s the sting in the tail. Obviously, if I could have my time again there is no way I would do it, but if I hadn’t, I wouldn’t have been raped and the private prosecution wouldn’t have been forthcoming. I had the support to do that and other women didn’t. I wouldn’t change that for the world.” Would she be happy if her kids did the same? “The only reason to do that type of work is money. I would be concerned if I was not supporting them.”
Someone who’s given the issue a lot of thought is Sam Roddick, a former prostitutes’ rights campaigner and owner of sex shops Coco de Mer. She also curated, with actress Emma Thompson, an exhibition about trafficking called Journey. “Trafficking is nothing to do with prostitution,” she says. “It is slavery.”
Along with many others with a close interest in the business – even police, off the record – Roddick believes the only way forward is legalisation. “It’s an extraordinarily complex issue. There are a lot of problems because it’s an unregulated industry with no ethic attached to it. We need to inject some expectations into it and it has to be run by the women who are providing the services.”
She also has a theory about the people who use prostitutes. “Who’s the punter? The punter is everyman. And why is it growing? Because they’re disassociating from themselves sexually, and from their emotions. It’s an expression of self-hate. Men who go to prostitutes, no matter how much they think they are functional, are people who can’t be honest with themselves about who they are. When you scratch the surface and start to ask questions about their emotional relationship to their own sexuality, you find big dark holes.”

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