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FernandaFerrari
A disproportionate number of Indonesia’s prostitutes come from this one small cluster of villages in West Java. Not every girl here becomes a sex worker, but again and again in these villages we hear the same story: when an Indramayu family has a baby girl, they celebrate. They know that, if it becomes necessary in the future, she’ll be able to support her whole family. Indramayu has become the region that sells its daughters.
SHARE Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Link Seven-year-old Disty at the ceremony to mark the circumcision she had at birth. Photo: Eka Nickmatulhuda.
Nur’asiah is a slight 21-year-old. On the wall of her grandparents’ house in the Indramayu village of Bongas hangs a picture of her as a little girl dressed up as a princess. But this young woman is herself the mother of a six-year-old son, born when she was 15. She is also a veteran of an 18-month career as a prostitute and “sexy dancer” in the King Cross bar in the north Jakarta suburb of Kelapa Gading.
“A friend from a nearby village offered me the job,” Nur’Asiah says. “She was also a sexy dancer.”
Girls there were paid about $10 for dancing four times a night, and another $1 if her guest bought a drink. But the real money was for sex. At first Nur’Asiah only wanted to dance, but the bar owner pushed the point.
“The boss suggested I take some money for the family,” Nur’Asiah says. “After he offered that, I called home, asking people here what they wanted . I knew then that by saying yes, I’d have to do sexy dancing ‘plus plus’. ”
The loan was 30 million rupiah (about $3000), which her family used to renovate their house and buy a motorbike and rice seeds. Money also went to support Nur’Asiah’s son. She’d accompany clients back to their hotels, earning 1 million rupiah (about $100) for sex.
“The first time I was nervous and afraid because he was a stranger, and I was sad because it was not with someone I liked or loved,” she says. “I feel like I was forced. I didn’t like it, but I needed the money.”
Her grandfather, Dasmin, a beneficiary of the house renovation, is comfortable with what has happened.
“She chose the job; it was her own choice,” he says as Nur’Asiah looks on impassively. “But the most important thing is that she did it for the family.”
For perhaps 30 years Indramayu has been exporting its daughters, from the age of 15 or 16 up, to brothels across Indonesia. Though this course of action is so common that there is very little stigma, officially it’s frowned upon. In 2007, Indonesia banned the traffic in girls under 18. But the industry adapted, and these days many young Indramayu girls are recruited by their friends, says Sukim, a former pimp who now works at Yayasan Kusuma Bongas, a non-government organisation devoted to fighting the recruitment of sex workers.
Middlemen still play a role behind the scenes, but if the first suggestion of a career in prostitution is made to a new girl by her friend, the real traffickers can plausibly deny their involvement. The rest of the model is unchanged: girls are still pressed to take loans, which are then used as a tool by the pimps and madams, who are all called Mami, to keep them loyal.
The first money is small and goes directly to the new recruit to buy clothes, make-up and a trip to the “magic man”, or dukun . Many Indonesians hedge their bets between Islamic observance and village magic, but, for practical purposes, they place greater faith in the latter. The dukun performs a ritual which they believe symbolically implants a diamond in the girl’s body, “to make her prettier and more desirable”, Sukim says.
The pimp or channeller then goes out of his way to extend the loan, “pampering the parents” to create an ongoing debt. The parents outdo each other to build the most enviable house in the village. The houses act as a marketing tool to lure other families into the trade.
“Who were the most successful people? Sex workers,” says Sunenti, another girl who took the bait. For the girls, though, the debt is a burden. Many sex workers live in dormitories guarded by brothel staff. “It’s not easy to go out, even on your day off or to go shopping, because security guards go with you,” says Nur’Asiah. “They follow you to make sure you don’t run away or go to work in another bar.”
Ask people here why they sell their daughters and the answer is faktor ekonomi – economic reasons. Indramayu is sustained by three industries: rice growing, sending people to countries such as Saudi Arabia and Malaysia as migrant labourers, and remittances from sex work.
In the vast rice fields, people toil in the wilting sun for just 30,000 rupiah – around $3 – per day. Even in this slow-speed rural economy, it’s barely enough to survive, much less buy a house. Offshore migrant labour means years away from home, and the horror stories of mistreatment, including rape, are legion.
There are no factories in Indramayu and the education system is so poor that few people are qualified for even the most basic white-collar job. According to Sukim, everyone has access to primary school but there are only a few middle schools (years 7 to 9) and, in Bongas at least, no high school at all. By the age of 11 or 12, many children have dropped out entirely. By 15, the girls, bored and unemployed, have watched older friends return to the village for religious holidays, desirably light-skinned from night work, with money to splash around, wearing beautiful clothes and make-up.

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